Bill's Site

Marine Listening and Observation Pages and Links

Last updated December 4, 2019

My interest in marine listening comes and goes. My radio hobby began with a combination of listening to distant AM radio and listening to Marine radio along the BC coast when I was a teenager. In recent years I mostly listen in on cruise ships visiting Halifax from April to October.  Marine listening on the old 2 MHz band is where I got my start in radio monitoring. Today's shipping uses four main radio bands:  MF/HF (2 MHz - 30 MHz), VHF Marine Band, the UHF 400 MHz on-board bands, and various Satellite services.   This scanning website deals with the VHF and UHF aspects only. 

My Specialized Page on VHF and UHF marine radio in our region, and on Halifax Traffic (with a map of the sectors and calling-in points)

 Despite my naval background I am most interested in cruise ships. I use the official cruise ship schedule included at Port of Halifax.   Some years I post an expanded schedule showing information about the ships.   I follow their movements online at www.marinetraffic.com, but recently I have also been using Cruise Ship Tracker as it clearly shows ship names (not just cruise ships), is easily navigated and has associated cruise ship information and itineraries. List of Cruise Ships and where they are in the world right now!  

Cruise Critic's Cruise Ship ItinerariesAlso includes Notes on new ships and ships being reconditioned etc.

Cruise Ship WebcamsSome cruise ships have webcams…watch from the perspective of a passenger or the captain!

Click here for sailwx Or go to www.CruiseCal.com   Presented in two different formats.

I also check the harbour webcams in our region from time to time.  Here are some major relevant cameras:

Piers 20 to 22 (main cruise ships berths)

Halifax waterfront from Alderney Gate

The Narrows and McKay Bridge

Macdonald Bridge area from south

Chebucto Head webcam

Central Harbour east of Georges, showing Eastern Passage

Saint John Harbour CBC Webcam  

Saint John Harbour Webcam  

Saint John Hbr Webcam 3


Halifax
is of course a major port in the Canadian context but is dwarfed by many other world ports, including our biggest Pacific port of Vancouver.   It is quite interesting however with its steady flow of container ships, auto carriers, tankers, cruise ships and offshore support vessels, as well as our own navy and coast guard fleet, and occasional foreign military vessels.   

Like me, you will find the photos and commentary on the following observation and data websites to be very interesting:

 

Shipfax

 

Tugfax

 

Cap'n Ken's Blog

 

Halifax Shipping News

 

Seawaves


       

Links to Marine Related Websites of Interest

Notices to Shipping for the Maritimes

Radio Aids to Marine Navigation

My HMCS Restigouche page.  I was COMMO on Restigouche in the 1970's

   Shipspotting.com  a worldwide ship photo site

NOAA's Charts of the US Coasts, showing coastal Weatheradio sites and USCG stations. Excellent!

The Ship's List (Historical Records of Fleets and Passenger Lists)

Ships Nostalgia site (Interesting threads on ship and coast radio)

 Fond BC memories for me:  BC's Lighthouses    CPR's BC Coast Steamships.   BC Tugs forum  
West Coast Ferries Forum   
Tugboat Photo Site
    Evergreen Fleet (Ferries of Puget Sound and BC Coast)

Ready Aye Ready .. enthusiast site for the Royal Canadian Navy, current and historical

Description of the VHF Marine Band
especially in relation to Canada, and a channel by channel guide for the Halifax area and beyond.   

UHF frequencies commonly used on-board ocean-going ships  
Large ships  (including cruise ships) may use on-board radio to coordinate cargo handling, passengers and events.  For detail on which cruise ship uses which specific frequencies go to Bill Dunn's Cruise Ship Frequency website:  www.scanmaritime.com   

Bill's Map of Coast Guard Radio/VTS sites in Maritimes